Forefront: A Legacy of Long Art

In my latest contribution to the Forefront blog, I reflect on our need to adopt habits of "long art." Doing so can reconnect us to a theologically informed stewardship of our world and its beauty, ultimately pointing us toward eternal things: "To participate in the creation of long art, to spend time in its presence—this is…

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Forefront 360: Interview with Dr. Alastair Roberts

I recently had the opportunity to interview my friend Dr. Alastair Roberts, who I met last spring during the Davenant Institute's Protestant Wisdom Primer. We discuss here his recently published book Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture, which was a collaborative project with Andrew Wilson. Among other things, we cover the musical…

In Defense of Localism

An essay that I recently wrote has been published over at Mere Orthodoxy. In it, I argue that localism provides the much needed resources for building strong and compassionate communities, as well as anchoring our cultural and political endeavors to their proper aims. I also respond to the notion that localism, unchecked by a federal…

Poem of the Week: London Snow

London Snow When men were all asleep the snow came flying, In large white flakes falling on the city brown, Stealthily and perpetually settling and loosely lying,       Hushing the latest traffic of the drowsy town; Deadening, muffling, stifling its murmurs failing; Lazily and incessantly floating down and down:       Silently sifting and veiling road, roof and…

Poem of the Week: The Soldier

The Soldier If I should die, think only this of me; That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom England bore, shaped, and made aware, Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam A…

Poem of the Week: The Snowstorm

"Come see the north wind's masonry." Ralph Waldo Emerson said this of some other place, but it seems that he wrote these lines looking out my own window this morning. I have read this poem many times before, but as usually occurs when experiencing timeless poetry, today it takes on a new meaning. In the…

Poem of the Week: The Coliseum

The ColiseumType of the antique Rome! Rich reliquary Of lofty contemplation left to Time By buried centuries of pomp and power! At length—at length—after so many days Of weary pilgrimage and burning thirst (Thirst for the springs of lore that in thee lie), I kneel, an altered and an humble man, Amid thy shadows, and…

Isolation and the Old Spirits

Recent weeks have brought with them some fascinating reflections on the notion of disenchantment. Poe's "Sonnet—To Science," a poem I recently shared, laments the inevitable banishment of magic from the natural world at the hands of Science; then there's this excellent piece by Derek Rishmawy, in which he questions the disenchanted narrative a bit. Along similar lines,…